EDET 693 Week 3 Essential Question: Which emerging pedagogy appeals most to you, and might be most useful for your classroom and students? Why?

Initial Blog Post for EDET 693 Week 3

Emerging Technologies

by Aleta May

This Blog Post includes my own answers to questions I will ask classmates during a class Twitter Session for June 2, 2016.

Essential Question: Which emerging pedagogy appeals most to you, and might be most useful for your classroom and students? Why?

Sara Kitzan was my co-host for tonight’s Twitter Session. Aleta started the session out with one ice breaker question and began a discussion about Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs). This overlapped into blended learning environments. Sara will focus her questions, listed below toward the Flipped Learning Pedagogy:

  • How familiar are you with these emerging pedagogies?
  • Which emerging pedagogy is most appealing to you?
  • What benefits do you see for using any of these emerging pedagogies?
  • What drawbacks do you see for any of these emerging pedagogies?
  • Which emerging pedagogy do you feel you are most likely to use and why?

Ice Breaker Question 1 for Twitter Session:

What descriptive words or phrases come to mind to explain how Memorial Day felt for you this year?

Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) K-12

  1. Since creators are not out to replace teachers and schools, what is the purpose of MOOCs in K-12?

According Howard Lurie vice president for external affairs, edX is a nonprofit initiative, generated by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technolongy, (MIT) to enhance and expand “high school advanced placement (AP) curriculum . . . and it all leads to ways in which we can use blended models to teach AP courses “ Thompson (p. 2, 2013). Lurie thought of MOOCs as “sort of a talking textbook” (Thompson, p. 2).

  1. What are some challenges of integrating MOOCs into the high school curriculum?

One challenge according to Mr. Horn (co-founder and executive director of the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation, that created edX’s for K-12 online learning), is “complaints from superintendents about their inability to offer credit for MOOCs, because state education regulations require credit to be granted based on students’ “seat time” in actual classes, rather than their mastery of an academic subject” (Atkeson, p. 8, 2014).

  1. What do you think would make a MOOC highly motivational for high school students to use?

According to Ferdig (2014), “peer support can offset this lack of instructional feedback” (p. 26). Also, when a teacher enrolls in the MOOC, he/she can help students stay motivated by “adapting the content to their own courses or by having their students enroll for sections of the course to supplement face-to-face instruction. Najafi, Evans, & Federico (2014) found that compared to blended-mode students MOOC-only students actually scored higher as shown on posttest results. However, when blended-mode students followed a set pace in the course, keeping up with the video clips, they were able to remain “on-track more consistently” (Naiafj, et al., p. 317) and were “more likely to retake quizzes to achieve complete quiz points” (Naiafj, et al., p. 318). What these points show overall is that there will be challenges to integrating MOOCs into existing courses in schools, which points to making sure to include content from MOOCs that is relevant and enhances curriculum already in use in the classroom.

  1. What are some challenges of integrating MOOCs into the high school curriculum?

One challenge, according to Mr. Horn (co-founder and executive director of the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation), that created edX’s for K-12 online learning), is “complaints from superintendents about their inability to offer credit for MOOCs, because state education regulations require credit to be granted based on students’ “seat time” in actual classes, rather than their mastery of an academic subject” (Atkeson, p. 8, 2014).

  1. When is it okay or not okay to complete a MOOC?

When students want to just connect with other learners “as an extension of traditional courses where credits may be offered” (Bock & O’Dea, 2013, p. 10), non-completion is fine.

If the course is for credit in high school, this would mean an incomplete grade would be given.

  1. What are some advantages of integrating MOOCs into the high school curriculum?

One student in the article by Atkeson (2014), stated that he was motivated by the more challenging content that would help 1) prepare him for college because of the content, but 2) also teaches students how to teach themselves how to learn. Material can be learned on a person’s own time. 3) The focus can be on something the student is passionate about instead of just completing work for a class grade.

Describe more ways an online high school run course may be used to benefit students. 

One way was when the University of Miami developed and ran “a virtual seminar designed to help high school students prepare for the SAT II subject test in biology” (Bock & O’Dea, p. 1). The sessions were biweekly, used software that allowed students and teachers to interact synchronously.

  1. What do you think would make a MOOC highly motivational for high school students to use?

According to Ferdig (2014), “peer support can offset this lack of instructional feedback” (p. 26). Also, when a teacher enrolls in the MOOC, he/she can help students stay motivated by “adapting the content to their own courses or by having their students enroll in sections of the course to supplement face-to-face instruction. Najafi, Evans, & Federico (2014) found that compared to blended-mode students MOOC-only students actually scored higher as shown on posttest results. However, when blended-mode students followed a set pace in the course, keeping up with the video clips, they were able to remain “on-track more consistently” (Naiafj, et al., p. 317) and were “more likely to retake quizzes to achieve complete quiz points” (Naiafj, et al., p. 318). What these points show over all is that there will be challenges to integrating MOOCs into existing courses in schools, which points to making sure to include content from MOOCs that is relevant and enhances curriculum already in use in the classroom.

  1. What are some ways teachers of younger students may use interactive tablets to enhance learning? How might the use of these tablets integrate into your classroom learning structure?

In this same article, Amplify tablet-maker was referred to as one: (Virskus, 2014). At this site: http://www.fromthegrapevine.com/innovation/tablets-promise-boost-learning-classroom The first thing I noticed when I went to this site, was how young students were using lower cost tablets for interactive spelling / phonics / vocabulary.

  1. When using interactive tablets for older students, how would your hybrid approach look in a science or engineering course?

 While watching a video clip from the link above in order to understand how a tablet that is designed specifically for use in science projects; the Einstein Tablet+; is designed, I took notes:

 “A light and UV sensor; heart rate sensor; here is where the readings for temperature and humidity come in; microphone sensor and inside is a GPS and excellerometer; there are also enough supports to plug in eight external sensors from the multitude of external sensors available.”

An essential question in a Project-Based Inquiry Science textbook is paired with the tablet device, ready for students to experiment from books to display and share data immediately. Four meter representations include: analog, digital, bar, and color with a graphical and tabular view. Data can be emailed to other students, and use the plug to present to the class; https://www.iat.com ; and click on Einstein Tablet+ for use with STEM teaching.

  1. Do you think the same “process of scientific inquiry . . . depicted as a linear process with a prescribed series of steps” (Wells, 2016, p. 15) realistically represents how scientists gain understanding of questions or problems they seek to answer or solve?

As a focus on pedagogy in a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) learning environment that is highly invested in teaching using technology interwoven into the other three content areas, here is an example model that can work in a blended learning environment, whether using MOOCs or not.

An alternative to this pedagogy is to use designerly questioning through phases in a cycle to gather facts that are verifiable; convergent thinking; that sets groundwork for building divergent thinking; thinking about what is known to question what needs to be known. “… designerly questioning guides the student designer within a given phase throughout a design challenge” (Wells, p. 16, 2016). The phases are, Problem Identification, Ideation, Research, Potential Solutions, Optimization, Solution Evaluation, Alterations, and Learned Outcomes (P.I.R.P.O.S.A.L.). As I read through this alternative pedagogy, I believe the cycle makes more sense because it would be easier to integrate science with technology and engineering in a cycle that includes questioning within each phase. This is “design-based learning with the expressed intent of having students design to understand (D2U)” (Wells, 2016, p. 15). It is important to provide students with an integrative framework; and according to Wells, the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) model has tended to continue the traditional mode of separating content areas to instruct. Therefore, there is now a PIRPOSAL model that may be used for I-STEM ED (the “I” standing for integrative STEM).

References

Atkeson, S. Harvard-MIT Partnership unveils new MOOCs for K-12 (2014). Education Week, 34(5), p. 8.

Bock, M. & O’Dea (2013). Virtual educators critique value of mooc’s for k-12: Wide-open e-courses are a hot topic in higher ed. Education Week, pp.  Published in Print: Feb. 6, 2013 as Virtual Educators Critique of the Value of MOOCs for K-12). Wide-open e-courses are a hot topic in higher ed. Retrieved May 29, 2016 at:  http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/02/06/20moocs.h32.html?tkn=NSZFmvszDN2tK0%2BNwJrrzDQexTN%2FLLgH5WXx&print=1

Ferdig, R. E. (2014, January). What’s next: 2014 preparing for k-12 MOOCs. www.Techlearning.com

It’s About Time—Your partner in STEM education. Retrieved 6-2-16 at https://www.iat.com

Najafi, H. Evans, R., & Federico, C. (2014). MOOC integration into secondary school courses. Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 International License, 15(5).

Thompson, G. (9-5-13). THE Journal (August 2013 Digital Edition). 21st Century Curriculum. Get ready: MOOCs are coming to K-12: Includes Video Clip. Retrieved May 29th, 2016:  https://thejournal.com/Articles/2013/09/02/Get-Ready-MOOCs-Are-Coming-to-K-12.aspx?p=1

Virskus, J. (18, June 2014). Tablets promise to boost learning in the classroom. From the Grapevine. Amplify Tablet Maker. Retrieved 6-2-2016 at: http://www.fromthegrapevine.com/innovation/tablets-promise-boost-learning-classroom

Wells, J. G. (2016). PIRPOSAL model of integrative STEM education: Wonceptual and pedagogical frame-work for classroom implementation. Technology and Engineeering Teacher.

2 thoughts on “EDET 693 Week 3 Essential Question: Which emerging pedagogy appeals most to you, and might be most useful for your classroom and students? Why?

  1. Kodiak Reading Teacher

    Aleta you have certainly done your research about MOOCs and high school education I really enjoyed your twiiter session on this topic. In regards to MOOCs at the high school level I can’t agree more with the advantage of tailoring the MOOC to fit the design of the class and especially meet the unique needs of the students. Perhaps MOOC’s down sized is a better alternative than MOOC’s super sized. I know that there can be interaction between schools and locations. I feel like local MOOC’s are going to be more effective for HS students.

    Reply
  2. josies677blog

    Aleta,
    I enjoyed your twitter session, you brought a few good points about the challenges and purpose of MOOCs. I think that these “new” concepts of open and self paces learning methods are not just a trend, but has actually changed the industry. I like that we are starting to lean toward individual’s way of learning instead of standardized levels.

    Great job,
    Josie

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s