Category Archives: Emerging Technologies EDET 693

EDET678 Funding Proposal Screencast-O-Matic Parts I and II Links

Aleta May

EDET678

Part I of the Emerging includes a proposal that serves to define why it is important for schools and other stakeholders to invest in our technologies that challenge our students and go beyond computer programs designed only to instruct without much interaction:

Screencast-O-Matic Link for this presentation:

http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/cDj6rYi7wh

Part II of the Screencast-O-Matic presentation demonstrates how an Understanding by Design two week unit can serve to connect what students are learning when they use Arduino Electrical Circuitry (as one example) to the Alaska State Technology goals and standards, as well as to endless examples of content area standards that may be met by using Arduino.  In the unit I have written–students are studying middle school or older electric circuitry in physics as they learn to use coding in technology for future career goals.

Screencast-O-Matic URL for UbD unit lesson:

Link embed for Screencast-O-Matic UbD unit lesson:

http://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/cDj6rCi7xn

EDET 678: Funding Proposal–Part II UbD

Aleta May

Understanding by Design Template 2.0

Emerging Technologies 678, with Dr. Lee Graham

August 2016

Funding Proposal to go with detailed report description is attached. This is an example of how using Arduino electronic can lead students to deeper understanding of science, which will transfer to coding that crosses content areas.

Stage 1 Desired Results
ESTABLISHED GOALS

Technology:   Alaska Standards with Content Standards B. A student should be able to use technology to explore ideas, solve problems, and derive meaning.

1)     identify and locate information sources using technology;

2)     choose sourses of information from a variety of media; and

Technology:   Alaska Standards with Content Standards C. A student should be able to use technology to explore ideas, solve problems, and derive meaning.

 

A student who meets the content standard should:

1)     use technology to observe, analyze, interpret, and draw conclusions;

2)     solve problems both individually and with others; and

3)     create new knowledge by evaluating, combining, or extending information using multiple technologies.

Alaska Standards *Content and Performance Standards for Alaska Students Revised March 2006

The information the students learn will transfer to other content areas and more advanced coding skills.

 

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…move on to the next project in Arduino Electronics with less teacher facilitation
Meaning
UNDERSTANDINGS

1.     Students will understand voltage as compared with the analogy of water pressure; and two sides pushing electrons through a circuit.

2.     Students will understand that when resistors are each the same, then the voltage between A & C will be the same.

3.     Students will understand that current is measured by how many circuits flow per second—voltage pulls electrons; current is measured in amps.

4.     Students will understand that Ohm’s Law is what is used to calculate current that is needed to run through the circuit.

<type here>

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

1. Why does it matter what volts (the difference in pressure between 2 points in a circuit) are between two points?

 

2.   Amps measure current—or electron flow.What happens when resistance is added?

 

 

3.   When resistance is measured my ohm resistors, what keeps the flow of the current even? Give an example

4.   What does it mean to have volts push electrons through ohms of resistance? Why does this matter?

Acquisition
Students will know basic circuitry, and understand resistance. This will allow them to move on to deeper understandings and more meaningful/engaging projects like parallel circuits.                                                                

 

Students will be skilled at understanding basic circuitry and be ready to change preset computer code; eventually changing coding a lot to create project ideas for the real world.
Stage 2 – Evidence
Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence
Students will be evaluated based on participation with a partner or small group, with the use of a rubric. PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Using an Arduino breadboard, students will demonstrate their understanding of Volts, Amps, and Ohms. They will talk about what they are doing with peers, ask appropriate questions, use research to look up video demonstrations of how to do a project and be able to analyze errors to correct problems with a group/

The breadboard project will judge electrical circuitry success through the use of LED lights and coding that shows the middle volt (B) is 5.0 while A and C volts are equal to A and C OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will be provided sentence stems to use for explaining what they learned about simple circuits the first week. Each student will be given a different color of pen to show their contribution to the explanation—which may include a drawing.

 

The second week, students will write use the words Volts, Amps and Ohms to explain in writing and or drawings what they learned about resistance.

 

Stage 3 – Learning Plan
 

Students will work on this project over a two week timeframe

With 1 1/2 hours per week:

The first week students will create a   simple circuit

The second week they will to create a more complex circuit using a battery box, where they will be given time to understand the circuit and resistance in two different ways.   Students will watch a non polarized resistor that allows flow in the current to go either way, and light up an LED when electrons lose energy.

Volts, Amps, and Ohms, students will watch video clips together in small groups that explain

 

 

 

EDET 678 Week 12 Funding Proposal Final Project–Part I (see UbD for Part II)

Aleta May

EDED 678 Emerging Technologies

Shared District and School visToday I wrote an email requesting that I be allowed to attend the following District Wide In Service (DWIS) trainings. Usually there are many required special education trainings at these DWIS, I received special latitude as a half time special education teacher to attend technology trainings. To me, this states our school’s vision:

Robert,

For the DWIS I am interested in taking Robotics training, ALEKS (math) and STEM.  I believe Ashley Crace (Sped director) will be flexible with us on my receiving alternative trainings, since Dan is the primary sped teacher at our site.  She sounded flexible as well.

Aleta

Robert’s reply was:

Since your electives keep our school vision in mind, I’d say you picked some great classes.

Sent from my iPhone

For the Lower Kuskokwim School district, there is now a 2016-2019 Technology Plan Timeline at that has been added to the recently expired Technology Plan: http://www.lksd.org/lksd/tai/LKSD%202013-2016%20Official%20Technology%20Plan-1.pdf

This has been embedded within the LKSD Educational Technology Plan dated July 2013-June 2016. The categories are outlined below:

  • Goals, Standards, and Strategies;
  1. Internet Access–evaluation of Network District Technology needs (Bandwidth). TAI Budget
  2. Continue E-rate Process (contract Expires June 30, 2017)
  3. VTC details. (TAI Budget—General Fund)
  4. PD (TAI Budget—General Fund)
  • Technology Integration
  • Access (TAI / Site Budgets)
  • Professional Development
  • Assessment
  • skipped F
  • CIPA

Evaluating Innovation

Under each heading, there are details that have been addressed, and will continue to develop over time. I believe each and every category listed above affects buy-in to my proposed emerging technologies ideas for our schools. More specifically, we need the most improved internet access possible, technology needs to be integrated within interdisciplinary content areas, and I noticed that several areas listed above specify which categories funding is likely to come from for our school in particular.

The kits and equipment, kits, and supplies for each of electronic sewing, Tesla Bluetooth Circuitry, and Discover Circuits + Arduino each range in cost between $70. to $100. The products may be shared by students and items may be gradually added to and replaced

Connecting this Vision with My Vision for Embedding Emerging Technologies into the Primary through Middle School Classes:

I searched through our District Technology Curriculum and found several matches to emerging technologies I am interested in.

In Phase 2 of the Technology Curriculum, http://www.lksd.org/lksd/TAI/Tec_Curriculum.html

Under Ethics E3 it is stated that students should “Work cooperatively to share resources & networked information. This is under performance Indicator SS-Social Studies and Tech Standard C.2.” The connection I find for my proposed Arduino project (middle school and up) and Tesla Circuitry Kit for younger students, as well as, using Aruino Flora LED lights for sewing/art, is that students will work together grouped by interest. Phase 8 includes Continuing to learn basics of Internet:

    Identify different types of hyperlinks, anchors and URLs A.1. & A.2.
    Use search engines (e.g. Alta Vista) using appropriate syntax A.2., B.1. & B.2.
    Use Sherlock (Mac) or browser (Netscape/Microsoft) search tool to locate information on a specific web site A.2., B.1. & B.2.
    Use Boolean search strategies to narrow Internet searches A.1 & A.2. A.2., B.1. & B.2.
    Print specific web pages with teacher guidance A.2., B.1. & B.2.
Participate in at least one telecommunications project (either Apple Mail or an approved email system or web) W A.2., B.1. & B.2.

In Phase 8 of our Technology Curriculum Plan, I view using Arduino Flora sewing projects as part of teaching students to add Arts to Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics (STEAM). Students can learn how basic circuitry works by using conductive tread to sew into fabrics and add LED light designs. This is student centered in that some students are much more likely to have a desire to engage in learning where art and fashion are involved.

Meanwhile, there are so many tools already available to educators online, what is really needed are models that “connect curriculum to life outside the classroom . . . real-world application that is experimentation . . . and opportunities for vision and leadership” (Johnson, et. al., p. 6). My favorite is STEAM. The A in STEAM stands for arts+. Of course, teachers need support in “leveraging technology to connect teachers and students inside and outside of the classroom” (Johnson, et. al., p. 7).

There are some students who may be attracted to programming and electronics by using it for art and clothing, who would otherwise never be interested in electrical circuitry or computer programming. Mellis, (2014) Leah Buechley created the LilyPad Arduino.

This quote really stood out to me: “We aimed to design projects that are fun and whimsical but also complex and challenging. We assume that our readers have no previous experience, but limitless ability.” The projects listed for children in this article sound exactly like what I would like to try with our students.

As I looked over a FLORA Ardino Compatable Wearable platform, then read down to where it suggested a mico-lipo charger to reduce fire risks (especially with fabric), my first reaction is that they should just raise the price and put this into the set. When compared to the Lilypad, the FLORA is lighter, has bigger pads and the with larger holes that are easy to use with alligator clips (which many prefer to use). It is a Field Transmitter that now works with Arduino devices (and others) that have alligator clips. (7/13/2016).

The light up and flash skirt (with LEDs) is activated by the FLORA motion sensor. It is connected to with pixels through conductive thread that is all connected to the FLORA mainboard. The code can be adjusted for sensitivity to motion by changing one number. The battery is removed to hand-wash clothing. Air-dry all the way before adding the battery back in. This looks very popular for prom night: https://www.adafruit.com/products/659

However, incorporating emerging technologies (ET) and an instructional design approach with a constructivism paradigm is disruptive to traditional education. Therefore, stronger research support for validating change in educational practices is needed (Veletsianos, 2010). Further, we need to consider what innovations are sustainable. Contextual factors need to determine what works for the students. In order to promote reform, there needs to be change that is deep enough to alter how teachers view their roles, change needs to be sustainable over time, cross over to other classrooms (especially other subject areas) and teachers need to assume ownership of their innovative teaching pedagogy (Herro, 2016).

How does the electronic circuitry and more advanced Arduino projects will further the vision of the school?

For students 8+ years, there are kits listed at $99.99. I purchased mine on sale for 69.99. These kits are durable and reusable. Students could work in rotating groups to use kits, so that it is more cost effective. This is a LightUp Tesla Kit (Bluetooth Edition) that gradually increases the difficulty of students understanding basic circuits, all the way to beginning to write code for the microcontroller. This kit uses magnets to connect pieces for a variety of projects and includes a learning app for guidance. The magnetic circuit blocks snap together and with an iPad app (LightUp Tesla Kit Bluetooth Edition

www.lightup.io/app) that is included, students may hover over the connections to see the visual flow of circuitry (like x-ray vision) to not how it works. An Arduino Kit, alternatively, uses a breadboard with positive / negative wires and LED lights with wire legs that would be difficult for younger students to use. Here is a site where a starter kit called Discover Arduino Bundle may be purchased for 81.99. There are smaller kits available. The kits are well organized with pieces in packets and there are online resources with an electronics group you can join. http://learn.sparklelabs.com/electronicsgroup http://learn.sparklelabs.com/electronics

Lessons include 3 to 4 minute video clips that explain the concepts that build background knowledge—For example: As electrons and protons transfer through a conductor, they can shake electrons around as they move from high pressure through the conductor. This can make light; electrical waves; magnetic waves as it moves through the conductor. Then there are tutorials students may watch and review for how to make the electrical connections with the computer connected by USB cord, where students begin to learn how to use computer coding. Here is an example of a tutorial: http://learn.sparklelabs.com/electronics/2010/10/22/volts-amps-and-ohms/

As I teach using Arduino and other circuitry materials, according to the updated policies listed below, I will have permission to have students looking up information on their personally owned devices, such as video clips about how to complete the coding within an Arduino project:

Meanwhile, it will be important that stakeholders be convinced that middle school to high school students are based on five qualities and behaviors “for fostering a constructionist learning environment:

~~Keep it brief, relevant, and open;

~~Model the maker mindset;

~~Act like a scientist;

~~Reward curiosity and passion with rigor; and

~~Keep it safe   (welcoming, friendly space that is as free as possible from the pressures of time . . . students participate in their own assessment, allowing them to see its value and to gain literacy and autonomy through it” (Flores, 2016, pp. 17-18).

The cost of the Discover Electronics + Arduino Kit that can be obtained from timberdoodle.com and is connected to sparklabs.

Students need to learn basic electronic skills; such as coding, electrical circuitry as it relates to content areas while using the computer in ways other than blended learning programs and test taking. To compete in the 21st Century, our students need to see how, for example, using an Arduino kit with sensors they connect, then touch affects a baseline and comparison body temperature reading on the computer screen; as well as how to solve the problem of adjusting the code in the program to match the ambient air temperature in the room to be able to see LED lights light up when the touch or not touch sensors.

This technology will further this goal by doing the following for students: Presently, coding is a part of the many apps we use daily, and the uses include “thermostats, cars and just about every device we own” (Sehringer, M., 2016, p. 2). . Coding coursework prepares students for college-level courses and jobs (Shueh, 2014). Shueh, J. (2014, 25 June). Advocacy groups push coding as a core curriculum: Students must learn how to create technology to prepare for a computer-driven workforce.

Since a student’s day can be so filled with required curriculum standards and coursework, (Guest Author, 2015), the answer is to hybrid courses—“replace your math class with a math/CS hybrid class” (p. 2). We are already going this route when we declare that every teacher is a reading/writing teacher in every subject area. I agree. I am opposed to not adding coding into the curriculum after reading all the literature as to how much a part of our students’ lives computer science really is. Therefore, the cons are impossible for me to find.

I am proposing starting a low-key makerspace to bring in emerging technologies across primary through at least middle school grade levels

Flores (2016) noted that Vygotsky (1978), “introduced the concept of allowing learners to step beyond themselves” and to use each other as a resource to find this ceiling by letting students bump into the wall and then figure out how to get unstuck. The key would be to balance frustration that is productive with asking students leading questions that may get them to think about what to try next instead.

These are taken directly from the LKSD Policy:

Personally Owned Devices

Students may use personally owned devices (including laptops, tablets, smartphones, and cell phones) at any time during school hours—unless such use interferes with the delivery of instruction by a teacher or staff or creates a disturbance in the educational environment. Any misuse of personally owned devices may result in disciplinary action. Therefore, proper netiquette and adherence to the acceptable use policy should always be used. In some cases, a separate network may be provided for personally owned devices.

  1. Examples of Acceptable Use

I will:

    • Use school technologies for school-related activities and research.
    • Follow the same guidelines for respectful, responsible behavior online that I am expected to follow offline.
    • Treat school resources carefully, and alert staff if there is any problem with their operation.
    • Encourage positive, constructive discussion if allowed to use communicative or collaborative technologies.
    • Alert a teacher or other staff member if I see threatening/bullying, inappropriate, or harmful content (images, messages, posts) online.
    • Use school technologies at appropriate times, in approved places, for educational pursuits only.
    • Cite sources when using online sites and resources for research; ensure there is no copyright infringement.
    • Recognize that use of school technologies is a privilege and treat it as such.
    • Be cautious to protect the safety of others and myself. (p. 13)

Students need to have this digital citizenship taught to them. If they do not have an opportunity to be involved in using a variety of technologies, whether from school or brought from home, they may find out the hard way in the workplace.

Conclusion

 As a school district, we need to change “the culture of instruction” . . . “Technology does not change the cognitive rules for learning, but offers ways to better deliver the learning experience” (Hess, et. al., p.9). Our district (as well as many others across Alaska) needs to use technology in ways other than testing and pre-made programs. For example, I do use Lexia for reading, Dreambox for math, and we have Read 180 that is set up to be a blended learning environment with built in rotations. What we need to do district-wide (and perhaps beginning at our school) is strongly emphasized integrating technology into every subject area and use an interdisciplinary approach. I could be teaching science and use a breadboard not only to teach electronic circuitry, but to also calculate the difference between my body temperature in Celsius with other students, and we could discuss ambient room temperature and how that affects what we are seeing on the computer screen from the code that was copy and pasted in and then adjusted. Further, our students need to learn how to use coding—this may include gaming, which may in turn involve math or story telling.

The outlook for available funding for interdisciplinary uses of technology are very positive, since schools have been recognized as having students who are engaged in purposeful learning will be students who are prepared for the job force and be motivated to graduate. The E-Rate program was developed by federal policymakers; this program is called the Telecommunications Act of 1996, and “is a discount on telecommunications services for schools and libraries “ and it is “overseen by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)” (Hess, Hochleitner & Saxberg, 2013). This program is up for expansion of provisions for high-speed Internet to 99 percent of America’s students by 2017” (Hess, et. al., p. 2). President Obama and his education team calls this “ConnectED.” This is major for our school district!! The higher speed of internet we have, the more the equipment we already has can be effectively used to make available courses and/or tutoring they need.

References

 Adafruit—FLORA – Wearable electronic platform: Arduino-compatible – v3. Flora arduino microcircuits (projects at the bottom):

Qi, J (2012). Interactive light painting: Pu gong ying tu (dandelion painting). Retrieved 7-17-2016 at: https://vimeo.com/40904471 Sparkle skirt with flora motion sensor: https://www.adafruit.com/products/659

Buechley, L. (November 15, 2012). Leah Buechley: How to “sketch” with electronics (Sketching Electronics)  Retrieved 7-17-2016 at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTBp0Z5GPeITed Talks 

Flores, C. (2016). Fostering a constructionist learning environment: The qualities of a maker educator. In P. Blikstein, S. L. Martinez, & H. A. Pang. Meaningful making: Projects and inspirations for fab labs and makerspaces.

 Hess, F., Hochleitner, T., Saxberg, B. (2013). E-Rate, education technology, and

 3 Reasons coding should be a core subject by Guest Author, September, 29, 2015 From Getting Smart. Retrieved 6-20-16  http://gettingsmart.com/2015/09/3-reasons-coding-should-be-a-core-subject/

Herro, D. (2015). Sustainable innovations: Bringing digital media and emerging technologies to the classroom. Theory into Practice, 54:2, 117-127.

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., & Freeman, A. (2015). NMC Horizon Report: 2015 K-12 Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

LKSD Educational Technology Plan dated July 2013-June 2016: http://www.lksd.org/lksd/tai/LKSD%202013-2016%20Official%20Technology%20Plan-1.pdf

Arduino kits: http://sparklelabs.com/index_store.php

Sehringer, Mendix WIRED Retrieved 6-20-16:  http://www.wired.com/insights/2015/02/should-we-really-try-to-teach-everyone-to-code/

Timberdoodle.com– LightUp Tesla Kit Bluetooth Edition:  www.lightup.io/app

Veletsianos, G. E-learning, Ideas open sharing work. Posted November 18th, 2015. In G. Velesianos (Ed), (2010). A definition of emerging technologies for education (pp. 3-22). Edmonton, AB: Athabasca University Press.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes (14th ed.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (Reference found in Malpica article)

 

EDET678: Reflection for Week 11

Aleta May

Reflection for EDET678 Emerging Technologies Week 11

Essential question: What specific policies will help your district prepare student for current and emerging technology use? How can you help lead your district in creating these policies?

At this site, our school district has a list of forms for acceptable use policies (AUP): http://www.lksd.org/technology/aup.html

This particular AUP for students seems to have been recently been updated and more detailed since the last winter semester when I reviewed these. I want to find the version I was shown at that time and compare them next; especially since our Technology Assisted Instruction (TAI) Director had told me the policies were being updated for the 2016/17 school year at that time. Here is the current link:  http://www.lksd.org/technology/aup/Acceptable%20Use%20Policy-%20Students.pdf

Gerald made the statement that “it starts with a motivated teacher!” I agree. Motivation needs to come with support as well. This comes in many forms. Policies are a great way to start.

The Learning and Technology Policy Framework from Canada seems to be a great fit for our state of Alaska as well. Although each of the 5 policy directions has many details under each category, each school district will need to go through these with a careful eye for how and what applies to their district specifically. This may involve a few additions, deletions and rephrasing in order to make it work. Every district, and even each school, has unique qualities to consider.

I really like the way some school districts have made video training clips for their district’s AUP and divided these further into videos for teachers and other staff members and a separate one for students.

References

Josie,

As I read what you wrote in your post: “School policies should be written in an easy format to comprehend,” I thought about how I found acceptable use policies (AUP) for teachers and other YouTube clips for students.

The balance between keeping students secure and not overly restricting the use of a variety of devices and Internet resources is difficult, but necessary if we are to move into the 21st Century technology skills use for our students.

Your post looks so clear and the way you applied each section of the k12.blueprint.com to your school district helped me think more in depth about how our school (and district policy) should look.

Aleta

Sarah,

I agree that it is so important to follow the district policies daily. At certain times of the school year, it is easy to relax on following these standards. We need to be vigilant on following policy and review these as a staff and with our students across the school year.

We do need to teach students to be responsible users of the Internet and follow acceptable use policy (AUP). Although it is not necessarily the easiest road to take, it is an important one. There will be students who continually test the system, and abuse it. Does this mean we should restrict everyone’s access? Though it may be difficult at times to locate the specific system abusers, we need to continually find ways to supervise students, and have a step plan for consequences and how we will solve the issue(s). One way is to have a point person in the school who can be talked to by students, anonymously, about issues such as cyberbullying and hacking around the schools safety net system.

Thank you for such a great post!

Aleta

Gerald,

Equitable access to broadband is so important. In our school, it seems to me the best way for this is to improve our wifi access in the classrooms and to continue to increase to higher speed access, especially for high demand times. Student resources in my mind include not only devices to use, but human resources for using computers and iPads in ways never before considered in our school (Arduino and electronic coding training, as well as creative and artistic applications).

Blended distance learning in our school needs a designated person to oversee student progress. When this is added to classroom teachers in middle through high school, it is like teaching two classes at one time. The problem with this for our secondary teachers is that they are already teaching multiple subject areas throughout their day. Until we reach the point of interdisciplinary instruction, adding to the plate of our upper level teachers is too much to ask. Maybe I will be the designated person; who knows. Each year is a bit different for me.

Aleta

EDET 678 Week 11: Essential question: What specific policies will help your district prepare student for current and emerging technology use? How can you help lead your district in creating these policies?

Aleta May

Initial Post for Emerging Technologies Week 11

EDET 678, Dr. Lee Graham

Essential question: What specific policies will help your district prepare student for current and emerging technology use? How can you help lead your district in creating these policies?

There are five Policy Directions detailed in the Learning and Tecnology Policy Framework (2013):

  • Policy Direction 1: Student-Centered Learning
  • Policy Direction 2: Research and Innovation
  • Policy Direction 3: Professional Learning
  • Policy Direction 4: Leadership (building capacity within the system to leverage technology for student-centered learning)
  • Policy Direction 5: Access, Infrastructure and Digital Learning Environments

In my estimation, our district is working to improve in all of these areas, and this is no easy task when it is across the great vast tundra of western Alaska. For each of the above categories listed above, there is a chart that lists detailed descriptions of what these look like. I believe that this framework would work well for our district as one to hold our special technological challenges up to.  I am visualizing our’s mirroring this framework. It is very important to note that Canada faces many of the same challenges we face in Alaska. For example, there are wide expanses of tundra, woods, mountains, rivers, that hold within these students who deserve the best education available. This means that reaching across the wide-expanse needs to involve close connections to Internet providers, satellite companies and for us an understanding of funding through E-Rate.

The E-Rate program was developed by federal policymakers. Telecommunications Act of 1996, the E-Rate program “is a discount on telecommunications services for schools and libraries “ and it is “overseen by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)” (Hess, Hochleitner & Saxberg, 2013). This program is up for expansion of provisions for high-speed Internet to 99 percent of America’s students by 2017” (Hess, et. al., p. 2). President Obama and his education team calls this “ConnectED.” This is major for our school district!! The higher speed of internet we have, the more the equipment we already has can be effectively used to make available courses and/or tutoring they need.

As a school district, we need to change “the culture of instruction” . . . “Technology does not change the cognitive rules for learning, but offers ways to better deliver the learning experience” (Hess, et. al., p.9). Our district (as well as many others across Alaska) needs to use technology in ways other than testing and pre-made programs. For example, I do use Lexia for reading, Dreambox for math, and we have Read 180 that is set up to be a blended learning environment with built in rotations. What we need to do district-wide (and perhaps beginning at our school) is strongly emphasized integrating technology into every subject area and use an interdisciplinary approach. I could be teaching science and use a breadboard not only to teach electronic circuitry, but to also calculate the difference between my body temperature in Celsius with other students, and we could discuss ambient room temperature and how that affects what we are seeing on the computer screen from the code that was copy and pasted in and then adjusted. Further, our students need to learn how to use coding—this may include gaming, which may in turn involve math or story telling.

Additionally, our district needs a policy that is very clear on how to appropriately use social media in school, safely. According to an interview in an article by Winske (2014), we need to prepare our students for appropriate use of social media, since they will be facing this in workplaces anyway. If we overly restrict or ban YouTube, Facebook in order to prevent the possibility of cyberbullying, we are removing the opportunity for students to learn how to handle situations. I agree with this quote,

“I actually think one of the things that might happen if you open these resources (social media, YouTube, etc.) to use in schools is not necessarily that you’re going to see more bullying, but that you might create an opportunity for a teacher to see something and say hey what’s going on? Is this common? Are you doing it? Is it being done to you? “ (Winske, 2014).

A strong acceptable use policy (AUP) will guide teachers and students to consistently teach and refer to rules already set in place, while simultaneously teaching appropriate formal use of Internet spaces and how this is different from informal uses away from school (and futuristically in their workplaces).

Basic Acceptable Use Policy Tech Training YouTube clip from Magnolia ISD’s Acceptable Use Policy for teachers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QQ1qqa4OQw

Acceptable Use Policy for Kids created by Kaitlin Fajks using PowToon:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbHxDIdS4q8

References

 Hess, F., Hochleitner, T., Saxberg, B. (2013). E-Rate, education technology, and school reform. American Enterprise Institude.

Minister of Education (2013). Learning and Technology Policy Framework. Edmonton, AB: Crown in Right of the Province of Albrta copyright. http://www.education.alberta.ca/LTPF (2013).

Winske, C. (2014). Tips for creating technology policies for K-12.

YouTube Video Clips:

AUP Video Clip for Teachers:

Griffin, K (April 25, 2016). How to deal with Acceptable Use Policies & Cyberbullying in the classroom.  Retrieved 7-31-16 at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QQ1qqa4OQw

AUP Video Clip for Students:

Fajks, K. (September 14, 2015) Acceptable Use Policy. Retrieved 7-31-16 at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbHxDIdS4q8  (created using powtoon: http://www.powtoon.com/join )

 

Reflection for Week 10, EDET678; Essential Question: How are electronics viable additions to “crafting” for today’s young person?

Aleta May

Reflection Post for Week 10

EDET678

After such a wonderful day going to the coast and breathing in the fresh air, I am so refreshed!

How are electronics viable additions to “crafting” for today’s young person?

The answers to this question are so expansive, I cannot even imagine covering it all.

According to Wohlwend and Peppler (2015), “Playshops bring together childhoold strengths with school curricula in play, collaboration, new technologies, and a content area such as literature, arts, and sciences.

Further, they argue that children use play to open access to rigorous learning—new knowledge is connected to their personal experiences by learning with a variety of learners (Wohlwend & Peppler, 2015, 26). The picture from this article reminds me of the Ted Talk video clip I watched this week about how home made play dough is made more from salt and is more conductive of electrons than the store bought brands which are stiffer and made more from sugar. With positive and negative wires and electronic circuits.

Learning is not all rigor and no play! (1)

There is a “false dichotomy of reducing playtime in favor of more time to lern math and literacy. But pay can deepen learning even in core content areas” (Wohlwend, & Peppler, 2015, p. 22) I don’t agree that the Common Core forces schools into this false dichotomy—in fact, I believe the Common Core Standards (CCS) allow us to write our own curriculum as long as we can justify it with what is outlined that students need to learn at a variety of grade levels. In fact, I would reach further than both the authors of this article and the CCS and proclaim that we need to blend playtime styles of learning with CCS, thus exceed the expectations of both.

I have much experience with both teaching freely—then being pushed into a testing vortex …

I gained so much inspiration this week from reading other’s posts, commenting on these, participating in a Twitter Session and reading/watching pertinent video clips on how to weave play, electronic circuitry, and content areas into the learning process. This was a very inspiring week!

Discussions from Week 10’s Blog:

Josie,

First, I really enjoyed reading your post! I really did not realize just how much technology has spread across the arts and wearable fashion. When our students have time for creating, they are amazing at it. From past experiences I have had with them, I believe this Bike Turn Signal Jacket would be awesome! Our students at Lewis Anagapak Memorial School would probably have different applications to their design; since they ride bikes usually in daylight (after the snow has melted). The issue is more about seeing kids walking on the boardwalk during daylight hours with 4-wheelers and snow machines riding by.

That craft site with beginner tutorials would awesome—especially projected onto a Smartboard and having students draw on the board.

Thank you for sharing that Chibitronics video!

Aleta

 

Tricia,

Wasn’t Jie Qi’s dandelion painting beautiful. And yes—an awesome example of how we can incorporate art, technology (electronics) and science.

I noticed the classroom pack as well—but missed the educator discount. This sounds like a great deal for getting started. Then we can take off on our own as facilitators of teaching circuitry and art.

Aleta

I replied to Daysha’s initial Post:

Daysha,

It seems like young kids will be very non-threatened by using Chibitronics. One problem we may encounter is that they will need to begin with those specific instructions, and likely want to jump ahead. If we as facilitators can control the urge to teach “why” (circuits, etc. ), and slow them down to follow directions for how to make it work first. Then the next project can be more of their own creation and some explanation of positives/negatives/ neutrons etc. woven in.

My bachelor’s degree was in Home Economics–Social Services. When you talk about uneven seams, this definitely brings back memories! Sewing with electronics is something I am going to do.

Play dough circuits sound so fun! AnnMaria Thomas: Hands-on science with squishy dough; demonstrated that homemade playdough has half the resistance (meaning it will conduct electricity) of commercial playdough. Sugardough has 150 times the resistance of salted dough. Combining these can mean parallel and series circuits, LED lights work when the legs are separated in the dough not work when the dough is pushed together.  So I bookmarked the links to the videos you shared: http://stthomas.edu/SquishyCircuits

Thank you for sharing the CircuitSticker Storytelling YouTube (Chibitronics): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQtPhaVraZA I saw the potential!

Daysha replied to my initial post:

daysha2016 says:

July 24, 2016 at 1:09 am

Aleta, I agree that crafting may be another avenue to teach electronics and programing to students who might not be interested in it otherwise. I also love the idea of the light up Kuspuks! What a great way to blend cultural traditions with new technologies! Can you imagine if they designed it to look like the northern lights?

I replied to her on my post:

Daysha, I had not even thought of the northern lights idea! A fading in and out on curved lines going down the back (especially in colors from whitish to greens! I was trying to think of using LEDs on the ric/rac zig/zag design they usually sew in, but didn’t really feel that was creative enough. We have group intellect going on here! Thank you for that, Daysha, because I am beginning to better understand how powerful that can be.

Aleta

Reference

Wohlwend, K. & Peppler, K. (2015). All rigor and no play is no way to improve learning. Kappan, 96, pp. 22-26. kappanmagazine.org,

EDET 678 Week 10: Essential Question: How are electronics viable additions to “crafting” for today’s young person?

Aleta May

Emerging Technologies

Initial Blog Post EDET678 Week 10

Essential Question; Week Ten: How are electronics viable additions to “crafting” for today’s young person?

There are some students who may be attracted to programming and electronics by using it for art and clothing, who would otherwise never be interested in electrical circuitry or computer programming. Going through to look over what is available for younger students through high school was very fun and very eye opening to me.

Specially designed Kuspuks might interest some of our students as well. This image was taken from Bing:

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As I watched the light show of Qi’s Interactive light show, I saw nature expressed as clouds, the effect of time lapse and the overlapping of music and drawing. Then I saw Qi blow on the white puffs to watch the seeds disperse, generating new flowers— with the use of LED lights with sensors receptive to her breath, a science lesson was taught through art.

How beautiful it was to see that the drawings were exposed to be copper tape, buttons and what looked like a connecting piece that may have connected these copper conductors to microcontrollers. I clicked on the embedded link and learned that I was right about the circuitry being made up of microcontrollers, LEDs and of course microphones to produce the music. Programmable Paintings take in elements of art and painting, with the addition of “interactivity of electronics and computation” (http://technolojie.com/pu-gong-ying-tu-dandelion-painting/). I clicked here for the sound code: http://technolojie.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Dandelion_painting.txt This could be used much like the Arduino kit, but I would need to dig a little deeper to find out where to actually copy and paste the code or how to use it for a project with students.

I have a Circuit Sticker Sketchbook by Jie Qi that I recently received. I was excited to dig deeper into Qi’s Dandelion links to reach this link: http://technolojie.com/circuit-sticker-sketchbook/ This book is designed to build into the pages in the book. From there, there is a Sketchbook sample for creating a book that combines circuits + origami. I found out by going to the chibitronics store, they sell a classroom pack (for 30 students) for $110. This would be a good way to get kids started since it has templates to follow.

Designing electronics is generally cumbersome and expensive — or used to , until Leah Buechley and her team at MIT developed tools to treat electronics just like paper and pen. In this talk from TEDYouth 2011, Buechley shows some of her designs, including a paper piano you can sketch and then play. This came from Leah Buechley: How to “sketch” with electronics YouTube link: : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTBp0Z5GPeI

Mellis, (2014) Leah Buechley created the LilyPad Arduino. The projects sound like such a fun way to teach basic programming and electronics. Leah’s graduate student , Kanju Qiu, is a co-author with her for Sew Electrick: A collection of DIY projects that combine fabric, electronics, and programming. This quote really really stood out to me: “We aimed to design projects that are fun and whimsical but also complex and challenging. We assume that our readers have no previous experience, but limitless ability.” The projects listed for children in this article sound exactly like what I would like to try with our students.

I agree with Buechley that there is a strong “creative artistic medium” to sewing electric, and making “mass produced products” may occur, but then the personal uniqueness intrigue will be lost. Wow—she is drawing in on large-scale architectural work now—even designing a home and studio with her partner to develop a maker space. As Buechley articulated, “It’s wonderful to be soldering, programming, sewing, and painting again!” I can see myself doing this grandma style a year from Christmas break in our outside room Dan and I are building for ourselves next summer.

Using a LilyPad to communicate with a computer, students can “build a soft piano that plays music both on your computer and through a sewn-in speaker” in about 4-10 days. Electronic materials for this include: Lilypad Arduino simple snap, LilyPad speaker and protoboard, FTDI breakout board, conductive thread and a mini-USB cable.

Piano2

As I looked over this FLORA Ardino Compatable Wearable platform, then read down to where it suggested a mico-lipo charger to reduce fire risks (especially with fabric), my first reaction is that they should just raise the price and put this into the set. When compared to the Lilypad, the FLORA is lighter, has bigger pads and the with larger holes that are easy to use with alligator clips (which many prefer to use). It is a Field Transmitter that now works with Arduino devices (and others) that have alligator clips. (7/13/2016).

The light up and flash skirt (with LEDs) is activated by the FLORA motion sensor. It is connected to with pixels through conductive thread that is all connected to the FLORA mainboard. The code can be adjusted for sensitivity to motion by changing one number. The battery is removed to hand-wash clothing. Air-dry all the way before adding the battery back in. This looks very popular for prom night: https://www.adafruit.com/products/659

References

Adafruit—FLORA – Wearable electronic platform: Arduino-compatible – v3. Flora arduino microcircuits (projects at the bottom):

Qi, J (2012). Interactive light painting: Pu gong ying tu (dandelion painting). Retrieved 7-17-2016 at: https://vimeo.com/40904471 Sparkle skirt with flora motion sensor: https://www.adafruit.com/products/659

Buechley, L. (November 15, 2012). Leah Buechley: How to “sketch” with electronics (Sketching Electronics):  Retrieved 7-17-2016 at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vTBp0Z5GPeI  Ted Talks

Mellis, D. (Feb. 4th, 2014). Sew Electric with Leah Buechley—Interview.

Chibitronics (2014). Electronics for everyone: Create, craft, code with Chibitronics circuit stickers. https://chibitronics.com

Chibitronics: http://store.chibitronics.com/collections/all

Fabric piano: http://sewelectric.org/diy-projects/5-fabric-piano/

Einarson, E. (01.01.13). Go bionic with these wearable arduino projects. Retrieved 7-17-2016 at: http://www.wired.com/2013/01/wearable-arduinos/

Soft Piano Image:

http://sewelectric.org/diy-projects/5-fabric-piano/

Picture for Kuspuk pictures were found on bing by typing in kuspuk images.